Latest emissions accounting data confirms need for carbon limit and price Media Release

Dec 13, 2013 - 12:00pm

The carbon limit and price laws are helping cut carbon pollution in sectors where they apply, but other sectors need policies to address their emissions growth, said The Climate Institute today in response to the newly released data from the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory.
 
The data show that Australia’s emissions overall rose 1.5 per cent in the year from June 2012 to 2013. Emissions excluding land use, land use change and forestry fell 0.1 per cent, with the biggest decline in the electricity sector. Emissions from electricity fell by 6.3 per cent, or nearly 12 million tonnes.  
 
“We’re seeing evidence that the carbon price is working,” said John Connor, CEO of The Climate Institute. “In the electricity sector, it is complementing the Renewable Energy Target and energy efficiency policies to achieve significant emission reductions.”


We’re seeing evidence that the carbon price is working. In the electricity sector, it is complementing the Renewable Energy Target and energy efficiency policies to achieve significant emission reductions. However, emissions from sectors that are not covered, or are only partly covered by the carbon laws, continue to grow.
However, emissions from sectors that are not covered, or are only partly covered by the carbon laws, continue to grow. These include resource extraction, transport, agriculture and deforestation.
 
For instance, fugitive emissions from mining and gas production jumped 11.4 per cent, reflecting growth in black coal mining and gas production. Transport emissions increased by 2.8 per cent. Agricultural emissions were up 2.7 per cent and net deforestation emissions up by 1.5 per cent, or 8.4 million tonnes.
 
“Our success in cutting electricity emissions is cancelled out by the lack of progress in these other sectors,” Connor said.
 
“This underscores the urgent need to limit and price carbon, but also ensure that we tackle uncovered sources of carbon pollution growth because Australia’s emissions are on an upwards trajectory.”

“This presents a challenge to the government, because without the price and limit on carbon the boom in LNG and coal emissions will blow the top off Australia’s recent success of limiting overall carbon pollution.”
 

“Australia is one of the advanced nations most exposed to climate change and its dangerous impacts. Our policies should be tighter and more effective. We need significant decreases in emissions if we are to avoid dangerous impacts of climate change.”

For more information
Kristina Stefanova | Communications Director, The Climate Institute | 02 8239 6299

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